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Unbelievably cool, Jessie’s Knit Dragon Wing Cowl is just..well..WOW! With the thorough & detailed pattern w/photos you can make this stunning & unique cowl

Dragon Wing Cowl ~ free knit pattern by Jessie At Home

Dragon Wing Cowl ~ Knit Version
Knit Pattern
Intermediate Skill Level
Designed by Jessie Rayot

The Knit Dragon Wing Cowl uses dropped stitches that are picked up and reknit in bunches to create fun ridges, and simple increases to give it shape. This pattern looks more challenging than it is. The trick is to make sure you count, and to not drop the stitches until the pattern says to! This pattern was inspired by the way I draped the Dropped and Found scarf in one of the photos. I loved the look and wanted to make a cowl that had that shape.

ETA: I had many requests for a crochet version, so here it is.
Another ETA: HERE you can find a chart that a lovely Ravelry knitter made for the pattern. I have not tried using it, but you may find it helpful.
HERE you can find the Português version translated by Silvia Silva

Ravelry Link

Dragon-Wing-Cowl-free-knit-pattern-by-Jessie-At-Home

Size:
One size fits most
28 ” long
6″ wide on small end, 24″ wide on large end

Yarn:
Red Heart Sparkle Soft in Starry Night #9854 1 full skein

Needles:
US 8/5.00 mm

Gauge:
15 sts x 32 rows = 4″ square in garter st after blocking
(18 or 19 sts x 31 rows pre~blocking)

Other supplies:
(3) 3/4″ buttons, or horn/toggle buttons that will fit under the re~knit stitches.

Stitches and Skills used:
k ~ knit
co ~ cast on
kfb ~ knit front and back (increase)
st(s) ~ stitch(es)

Getting Started:
Please read all the directions before you start. You will make a plain garter stitch piece to begin. Many people think this should be difficult, when it is not, so they try to add in stitches and drop things too early. This pattern is worked in garter stitch to start off, all the way until the piece is the nearly complete, then sections of sts are dropped and worked back together in larger sts. There are photos to help with this. There is a video to help with the finishing (it is a video for a pattern that uses the same technique, so even though the pattern is different, the technique is the same.) If you are at all confused, please watch the video, this is a simple pattern, if you are having trouble, you are most likely over thinking things.
The edge of this wrap has a chain look because of how the first stitch is slipped. Here is a tutorial showing the technique.

Pattern:
Using the Long Tail Cast on method, CO 35, start the cast on with a tail of about 2 yards; this will leave you with a long tail once the cast on is done, which will be used for finishing. Most other cast ons will not unravel properly for the dropped stitches, so be sure to use this method. Here is a tutorial to help.

Rows 1~116: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {35 sts}
Row 117: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K12, KFB, K6, KFB, K to end. ~ {37 sts}
Rows 118 & 119: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {37 sts}
Row 120: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K12, KFB, K7, KFB, K to end. ~ {39 sts}
Rows 121 & 122: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {39 sts}
Row 123: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K12, KFB, K8, KFB, K to end. ~ {41 sts}
Rows 124 & 125: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {41 sts}
Row 126: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K12, KFB, K9, KFB, K to end. ~ {43 sts}
Rows 127 & 128: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {43 sts}
Row 129: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K12, KFB, K10, KFB, K to end. ~ {45 sts}
Rows 130 & 131: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {45 sts}
Row 132: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K6, KFB, [K11, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {49 sts}
Rows 133 & 134: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {49 sts}
Row 135: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K7, KFB, [K12, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {53 sts}
Rows 136 & 137: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {53 sts}
Row 138: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K8, KFB, [K13, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {57 sts}
Rows 139 & 140: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {57 sts}
Row 141: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K9, KFB, [K14, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {61 sts}
Rows 142 & 143: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {61 sts}
Row 144: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K10, KFB, [K15, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {65 sts}
Rows 145 & 146: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {65 sts}
Row 147: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K11, KFB, [K16, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {69 sts}
Rows 148 & 149: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {69 sts}
Row 150: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K12, KFB, [K17, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {73 sts}
Rows 151 & 152: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {73 sts}
Row 153: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K13, KFB, [K18, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {77 sts}
Rows 154 & 155: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {77 sts}
Row 156: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K14, KFB, [K19, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {81 sts}
Rows 157 & 158: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {81 sts}
Row 159: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K15, KFB, [K20, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {85 sts}
Rows 160 & 161: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {85 sts}
Row 162: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K16, KFB, [K21, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {89 sts}
Rows 163 & 164: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {89 sts}
Row 165: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K17, KFB, [K22, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {93 sts}
Rows 166 & 167: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {93 sts}
Row 168: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K18, KFB, [K23, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {97 sts}
Rows 169 & 170: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {97 sts}
Row 171: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K19, KFB, [K24, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {101 sts}
Rows 172 & 173: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {101 sts}
Row 174: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K20, KFB, [K25, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {105 sts}
Rows 175 & 176: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {105 sts}
Row 177: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K5, KFB, K21, KFB, [K26, KFB] 2 times, K to end. ~ {109 sts}
Rows 178: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end. ~ {109 sts}

OPTIONAL SHORT ROWS – a kind Ravelry knitter wrote out instructions for adding short rows to the end to get more pointy points. Here they are:
9-sts short row:
knit 9sts past the first drop-3, w&t, knit back the 9sts, knit the drop 3, 9sts past the 1st drop-3, w&t; knit to the second drop-3, knit 9sts past that, w&t, knit back to the second drop-3 and then 9sts past that, w&t, knit to third drop-3,…to end of row
Rest row: knit
7sts-short row:
knit 7sts past the first drop-3, w&t, knit back the 7sts, knit the drop 3, 7sts past the 1st drop-3, w&t; knit to the second drop-3, knit 7sts past that, w&t, knit back to the second drop-3 and then 7sts past that, w&t, knit to third drop-3,…to end of row
Rest row: knit
and so forth

Here is a video to aid in the finishing of the cowl ~ it is actually from a different pattern, but the technique is the same.

Finishing:

Row 1: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K1, drop 3 sts, yo, K20, drop 3 sts, yo [K25, drop 3 sts, yo] 2 times, K20, drop 3 sts, yo, K2. ~ {99 sts}

Row 2: Slip 1 purl wise with yarn in front, K to end, ignoring dropped sts. ~ {99 sts}

Chains, Step 1: Pull the dropped stitches all the way to the bottom.

Step 2: Take the bottom 4 strands from the dropped sts, hold them together, and twist them half a turn to make a loop, * grab the next 4 strands together and pull them through the loop (do not twist), repeat from * until all the dropped strands have been turned into a chain. This can be done with your fingers, or with a large crochet hook. Leave the last loop free, it will be worked into the bind off. Repeat for each set of dropped sts.

Dropped-and-Found-Making-the-Chains

Bind Off: Bind off 2, slip the set of loops from the looped section onto the right needle, K1, pass all remaining sts on the right needle over the st just made (1 st left on right needle), bind off 20, slip the set of loops from the looped section onto the right needle, K1, pass all remaining sts on the right needle over the st just made (1 st left on right needle), [bind off 25, slip the set of loops from the looped section onto the right needle, K1, pass all remaining sts on the right needle over the st just made (1 st left on right needle)] 2 times, bind off 20, slip the set of loops from the looped section onto the right needle, K1, pass all remaining sts on the right needle over the st just made (1 st left on right needle), bind off remaining sts.

Block piece with edges folded under so that the first and last set of re~knit stitches are at the edge.

Sew buttons on small end, one at each corner, and one in the middle. Use the spaces under the re~knit stitches as button holes.

Wear or give and enjoy!

Dragon-Wing-Cowl-free-knit-pattern-by-Jessie-At-Home-2
Craftsy Link

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73 Comments

73 Comments on Knit Dragon Wing Cowl

  1. Fiona
    October 1, 2015 at 11:26 am (2 years ago)

    O ! M! G! That is gorgeous – I am definitely going to make that just as soon as I find a yarn worthy of such a beautiful design!

    Reply
    • Jessie
      October 1, 2015 at 11:47 am (2 years ago)

      Thank you! The Red Heart Sparkle Soft is very affordable, and looks great.

      Reply
  2. Amberly
    October 2, 2015 at 3:09 am (2 years ago)

    Jessie, I love this cowl!!! So much that I went to the store to buy the right size knitting needles because all I have are sets of 7, 10, 10 1/2, and 13. I already had an extra skein of RH Soft in black so that was great. Only trouble now is that I’ve done my swatch and it is far from right. My 31sts x 19 rows = 6″ x 2.25″. How can I fix this?

    Thanks a million!
    Amberly

    Reply
    • Jessie
      October 2, 2015 at 7:52 am (2 years ago)

      I had a rather big typo in the gauge swatch. It was backwards!! I fixed it, and I actually put in the after blocking gauge because you tend to get more accurate results that way, but the preblocking gauge should be 18 or 19 sts by 31 rows.

      Reply
      • Amberly
        October 2, 2015 at 8:48 am (2 years ago)

        Thank you Jessie for clearing that up. I was feeling a bit disappointed in myself. I thought I’d have to search for a new weekend project.

        Reply
        • Jessie
          October 2, 2015 at 9:20 am (2 years ago)

          No problem! Thanks for asking. I always prefer you ask before giving up, after all, sometimes I make mistakes. 🙂

          Reply
  3. Mary Karnstedt
    October 4, 2015 at 3:09 am (2 years ago)

    PLEASE tell me there’s a crochet version of this pattern?!

    Reply
    • Jessie
      October 4, 2015 at 9:29 am (2 years ago)

      There will be. Keep checking back. You can also sign up for email alerts of new posts on the top right of this site.

      Reply
      • Delaine
        October 8, 2015 at 1:25 pm (2 years ago)

        Yay! Although I am considering learning how to knit just to make this cowl. It is beautiful!

        Reply
        • Jessie
          October 8, 2015 at 1:54 pm (2 years ago)

          Well, now you can make one in knit and one in crochet!!

          Reply
  4. Tammy Hart
    October 14, 2015 at 7:11 pm (2 years ago)

    I’m just teaching myself to knit and my daughter is begging for one of these! I have a couple of questions. Is one skein of the yarn enough? About 200 yards of worsted weight? Do you use circular needles and if so, what length?

    Reply
    • Jessie
      October 14, 2015 at 7:14 pm (2 years ago)

      One skein of the suggested yarn is enough ~ the details should be at the top of the pattern. I used circulars because I pretty much use them for everything. I think I used 24″, but 16″ or anything longer is just fine.

      Reply
  5. Peg
    October 25, 2015 at 1:14 pm (2 years ago)

    coolest project ever!!!! i’ll be heading out today to find the red heart yarn. Can’t wait to make! <3

    Reply
  6. Michelle
    October 26, 2015 at 7:50 pm (2 years ago)

    This is so pretty! I kind of want to do it with the drop stitches in an accent color instead of all one color. Do you think it’s possible? I’m still a bit of a novice so I’m not sure.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      October 26, 2015 at 11:59 pm (2 years ago)

      It’s possible, if you twist it right, but it’s a LOT of work, and a lot of separate skeins of yarn.

      Reply
  7. Evelyn
    November 3, 2015 at 5:57 pm (2 years ago)

    I’m still having some trouble with making the loops. What size crochet hook do you recommend using? At the moment I’m using a 4.5 mm crochet hook since that’s all I have on hand, but I feel like it’s not big enough.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 3, 2015 at 6:48 pm (2 years ago)

      I think I used a K or an M/N. Your hook may be a little small, so that will make it difficult to catch all the strands.

      Reply
  8. Fatema
    November 4, 2015 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

    This is so awesomeeeeeee but I am a complete beginner at knitting…would you be so kind as to post a video on this?

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 4, 2015 at 7:36 pm (2 years ago)

      There is a video linked in the post that will show you a lot of what you need to know.

      Reply
  9. Saar
    November 8, 2015 at 10:33 am (2 years ago)

    Wow! Looks so awesome! Looks like it could be the top of a cool top/sweater too, if you ever feel like making a pattern for that: I’m interested!!

    Reply
  10. Theresa T
    November 13, 2015 at 6:19 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi Jessie,
    I am getting into knitting and absolutely love this cowl! This is a little too advanced for me but I know someone who would love this as well. Do you ever sell the finished projects? If so I would love to buy one!!!

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 13, 2015 at 11:55 pm (2 years ago)

      I don’t make them to order. However, it’s easier than it looks, if you have a knitting friend, maybe you can get a little help. Or, you can join the facebook group I linked in the pattern and you can try it and share pictures as you go. Then just ask if you get stumped, there is usually someone around who can help (often times it’s me), and if you ask and no one answers after a few hours, you can tag me and I’ll answer the next time I’m in the group.

      Reply
  11. Alona
    November 16, 2015 at 3:41 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi Jessie,
    This is by far the most interesting neck warmer pattern I’ve found and I would like to try to make it.
    I am not an experience knitter and not quite sure what blocking means and how it effects the work.
    I do have a yard in mind for this project, according to instructions, 4mm-6mm needles can be used on it.
    Using a 4.5mm needles I achieved 16 stiches over 21 rows gauge (again, not sure how blocking fits here).
    Is this yarn too thick? Or can I adjust the pattern somehow to it? If i use much smaller number needle I believe my project will be just be too stiff.
    Would love your thoughts on this.
    Thank you,

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 16, 2015 at 10:26 pm (2 years ago)

      If you look up blocking knitting on YouTube you will find many suggestions. For this project, I recommend laying the item face down on a pinnable surface and pinning it down, gently stretched. Then take a steam item, and HOVER (do not touch the yarn) over the item. You don’t want to soak it, just lightly steam it. Let it cool down and dry for 24 hours. When you remove the pins, it will maintain it’s shape.

      As for the gauge, a different gauge will change the size of the cowl. I can’t speak to how the cowl will look in different yarn and different gauge because there are just too many factors. Your best bet is to make a swatch and decide what you think.

      Reply
      • Alona
        November 23, 2015 at 5:32 am (2 years ago)

        Hi Jessie and thank you for the reply.

        I decided to go with a different yarn. It alternates between gray blue and black and has a metallic shine to it. Should look awesome with your pattern!
        I wasn’t able to achieve the gauge and at the end i decided to narrow by casting 31 stitches instead of 35. The length will be easier to control as I could stop and finish whenever I reach the size I want.
        As for adjusting the pattern, do you have any ideas of how could I avoid from dropping the wrong stitches, as in the stitches with the increase? So far I was thinking of doing K10 instead of K12 starting row 117. That would make 2 stitches less at the beginning and the end of each row. Not too sure how to make the proper adjustment from row 132 and on. Any ideas?
        Thank you!

        Reply
        • Jessie
          November 23, 2015 at 7:19 am (2 years ago)

          Alona,

          I didn’t really write the pattern in a way that makes it easy to adjust the starting cast on. There are only 2 sts before the first dropped sts, and after the last, so if you omit the first and last 2 sts on every row, the pattern will not work. I’m sorry, but I would have to write an entirely new pattern to remove 4 sts. You can ether go down a needle size, or have a wider cowl.

          Reply
  12. Sherry
    November 18, 2015 at 2:41 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi there! I successfully made this cowl and it is beautiful so decided to make another. I’ve run into a strange issue on the second cowl- when I start pulling down the dropped stitches one or two of them “disappear” and the run becomes too small to do the chains. I’ve gone back to figure out where those bloody dropped stitches have gone to no avail…does anyone have an idea about how to find them to make the run wider? Sheesh.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 18, 2015 at 3:04 pm (2 years ago)

      If you put an increase in the wrong place, or you dropped the wrong sts, that could be it. However, I know that I had the problem with one of my runs, and upon close inspection I found the stitch that had stopped dropping. The fuzz of the yarn had caused it to snag, so I had to pick at it with a yarn needle to loosen the snag, then it dropped and all was well.

      Reply
  13. Kris
    December 10, 2015 at 10:14 pm (2 years ago)

    I finished my cowl. It is beautiful! but it is too small. I swear the gauge was right on. I used Paton’s Classic Wool which is also a medium weight. I used Size 13US needle. I know that seems big but I always have to use larger needles to get the gauge. I’m super disappointed that it came out so small. I’ve not done much with blocking but even if I did steam it and stretch it out a bit, I still don’t think it would be big enough. The length of it is not enough to really make it all the way around and the wing does not cover even close to what I see in the picture. I’m 5’10” and have broad shoulders. Do I have this all wrong or do I just really need to move up to a chunky weight yarn to get it the size needed to fit a big person?

    Reply
    • Kris
      December 10, 2015 at 10:21 pm (2 years ago)

      I measured my finished piece. It is about 7″ wide at the small end, 20″ wide at the wide end, and 22″ long. I’m not sure how to get it longer and wider at the ends without it getting super wide at the start. I’m open for suggestions! Like I said, it is a beautiful cowl, I’m going to tuck it away for my daughter some day.

      Reply
    • Jessie
      December 11, 2015 at 7:31 am (2 years ago)

      Did you check the gauge to make sure you had it? From what you said, it sounds like you think you had gauge, but you didn’t check. So it sounds to me like you didn’t get gauge. Plus, different yarns react differently to blocking. The yarn I used tends to get a bit bigger, whereas a shrinkable wool could actually tighten up a bit if you blocked it with too much heat. My suggestions would be to make sure you have gauge by making a swatch, and to make the beginning longer before you start the increases so you know it will wrap longer. Just be sure to add a multiple of 4 rows. Also, if you make a yarn substitution, know it will act differently from the suggested yarn.

      Reply
  14. Amanda
    January 2, 2016 at 6:12 pm (2 years ago)

    mine came out very, very small…..even when I go to block it, it is so small and won’t fit over my 14 year old. All my stitches were counted properly. Can’t figure out what I did wrong! Tempted to rip it and start over….

    Reply
    • Jessie
      January 2, 2016 at 6:38 pm (2 years ago)

      Did you check your gauge? Did you check the measurements listed to be sure it would fit in the first place? These are the 2 most common mistakes. You can make it longer by making more rows before the increases start, make sure to make them in multiples of 4. If you don’t want to pull back that far, you can pick up the sts from the cast on and make it longer from the bottom.

      Reply
  15. Nicole
    January 31, 2016 at 6:28 pm (2 years ago)

    Mine also came out extremely small. I’m tiny and it won’t fit me. I plan on just taking out my bind off and trying to add more rows on that end as it didn’t get wide enough either. I tripled checked my gauge, rows, and stitches repeatedly throughout the whole project and followed the instructions down to the dots on the ‘I’s, but it just didn’t reach the expected measurements. I’m assuming the yarn I used didn’t take to the chains well? I’m going to attempt a few fixes and see if I can get it to where it needs to be. I’m really looking forward to seeing this one finished properly. I will update if I can fix it and hopefully that may help someone else who uses a different yarn as well 🙂

    Reply
    • Jessie
      January 31, 2016 at 7:49 pm (2 years ago)

      The recommended yarn is a very soft yarn, so it grows a lot when it’s blocked. If you use a different yarn, you really need to make the part before the increases longer.

      Reply
  16. Laura
    February 22, 2016 at 12:42 pm (2 years ago)

    Would it be alright if I made enough of these to sell on Etsy? I really enjoyed making this, and it came out looking awesome, but I can’t find any notices of whether or not I’d be allowed to sell it, so I thought I’d ask.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      February 22, 2016 at 1:30 pm (2 years ago)

      Thank you so much for asking! I have no problem with you selling finished items on Etsy, I just ask that you give me pattern design credit and include a link to the pattern in the description. Good luck!! 🙂

      Reply
  17. Brenda
    February 23, 2016 at 5:24 am (2 years ago)

    Hi, As I’ve chosen a different yarn to yours, I had to buy three balls of my yarn to meet the length required. So my issues is, I’ve just used up the first ball and need to add a new one…now later on at the end when we drop our stitches all the way down to the beginning, I’m worried that where I join my new ball may affect the overall looked of the reunited dropped stitches. Is there a safe place to make a join? Sorry if this sounds confusing.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      February 23, 2016 at 7:26 am (2 years ago)

      When in doubt, always join at the start/end of a row. With this stitch, I find that’s always the safest measure.

      Reply
      • Brenda
        February 23, 2016 at 10:42 pm (2 years ago)

        Thanks Jessie, my intention was to join at the start of the row. I’m on row 94. As the first stitch is the slip purl wise, yarn forward..it’s not technically a knitted stitch, so I was going to add it from the second stitch. Going by the photo, the cowl has the reknitted stitch feature up both outer sides, which would include the knitted stitch were I’m going to join my yarn…will it still unravel correctly if I do this join here. Sorry to ask further.

        Reply
        • Jessie
          February 23, 2016 at 11:25 pm (2 years ago)

          I would join with a loose knot at the end of a row and leave long tails. Then after you have dropped and looped the stitches you can untie the knots and weave in the ends before blocking.

          Reply
          • Brenda
            February 24, 2016 at 3:00 am (2 years ago)

            Thank you for your time. I love the look of this cowl and my daughter is dragon crazy.

  18. Mel
    July 6, 2016 at 12:37 am (1 year ago)

    Hi! I’m currently working on the first 116 rows, and right not that section is measuring about 8.5 inches wide, and also matches the gauge you have for a pre-blocked piece. After I rework the dropped stitches and block the cowl, will the width decrease sufficiently to match your final product?

    Reply
    • Jessie
      July 6, 2016 at 8:01 am (1 year ago)

      Yes, the finishing does make it thinner. The length will stay the same, but the width will decrease.

      Reply
  19. Danielle
    September 28, 2016 at 4:45 am (1 year ago)

    how many balls of wool will i need?

    Reply
    • Jessie
      September 28, 2016 at 7:44 am (1 year ago)

      I of the recommended yarn.

      Reply
  20. Jennie
    November 7, 2016 at 6:19 pm (1 year ago)

    Hello! First of all thanks for this wonderful pattern – I haven’t knitted in a while and this has been a lot of fun! I have successfully dropped all my stitches, but when chaining them up in sets of four I am left with only 2 strands at the top – since the pattern calls for 178 rows I think this is correct (178/4 is 44.5) but do I absorb those 2 extras into the last loop of 4 to make a final loop of 6 strands or keep the 4 strand loop and have a final loop of 2 strands?
    Thanks, and sorry for the confusing description of my dilemma!

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 7, 2016 at 6:46 pm (1 year ago)

      It should have worked to 4 because the cast on has 2. If you end with 2 left, then make your last 2 loops with 5.

      Reply
    • Jessie
      December 5, 2016 at 7:02 am (12 months ago)

      I looks great!!

      Reply
  21. nancy dubuk
    March 14, 2017 at 8:50 pm (8 months ago)

    I would like to make it with more defined, pointy points, but I’m directionally chanllenged!
    When do I start incorporating the “Optional Short Rows”? Are they part of the Finishing stage? Say, at Row 1 of the Finish? I’m really not sure.

    Also, when it says “Rest row knit” does that mean the rest of the 109 sts?
    And does the “So forth” mean the next repeat will be 5 sts beyond, then 3 sts beyond and then what?
    If you would please clarify, I’d so appreciate it. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      March 15, 2017 at 6:54 pm (8 months ago)

      I did not write the optional short rows, it was just something a nice Ravelry member did. I would say you start them just before the dropped stitches row. Rest row knit, means to knit to end of the row. so forth means to do the same thing to each section between the drops. That is my best guess.

      Reply
      • nancy dubuk
        March 16, 2017 at 7:24 pm (8 months ago)

        Thank you Jessie.
        I would love to hear from anyone else that can shed some light?
        I will give it a try, and post a comment afterward, if what I try actually works.

        Reply
        • Michele
          August 7, 2017 at 1:47 pm (3 months ago)

          @Nancv: I’m a fairly new knitter, love a challenge and usually my biggest challenge is reading a pattern! Have you figured this out? Could you share your ‘line-by-line’ directions – I can provide my email 🙂 I completed all the way to Row 178 & am stuck on the next steps (I want the pointed ends) THANKS!!

          Reply
          • Jessie
            August 8, 2017 at 10:53 am (3 months ago)

            I got the pointy ends with just blocking.

          • Lauren
            August 8, 2017 at 11:59 am (3 months ago)

            Hi Michele
            I’m also a fairly new knitter, but I had a look at knitting the short rows, and what I worked out is that they’re using a ‘Wrap and turn’ stitch. Essentially what they’re describing is adding a few extra rows of knitting around the stitches that you pull to create the ‘bone’ of the wing.
            So, that would mean for the first row, you w:
            slip 1 purl wise, knit 13, but then you would turn and wrap, and knit back to the edge, slip 1 purl wise and knit 9 stitches past the next ‘3 dropped stitches’, turn and wrap, knit 21 stitches, turn and wrap, ect.
            I would suggest looking up how to do a turn and warp if you haven’t done them before- youtube has a few good videos on the topic.
            I hope this helps.

  22. Lauren
    May 5, 2017 at 8:57 pm (7 months ago)

    Hi there.
    I was wondering if this was able to be knitted in the stockinette stitch, instead of the garter stitch? I was thinking about adding a bit of colour alongside the ‘ridges’, and to do that, I would be using a duplicate stitch, which doesn’t seem to work very well with a garter stitch.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      May 6, 2017 at 10:26 am (7 months ago)

      You could, I think you may have to chain less stitches at a time to get it to work because stockinette stitches are taller.

      Reply
  23. Jess
    July 27, 2017 at 12:10 am (4 months ago)

    Any thoughts on a way to use another yarn weight with this? Is there a part of the pattern that could be repeated to add more segments maybe? I have a skein of hand dyed that I think would look amazing, but it’s fingering weight.

    Reply
    • Jessie
      July 27, 2017 at 8:18 am (4 months ago)

      If you look at the chart you could add stitches between the repeats

      Reply
  24. Nikki
    August 20, 2017 at 2:22 pm (3 months ago)

    Hey! I looked at the pattern graph and I don’t understand what Green marker and orange marker are? Can you explain that to me or is there something I have missed in your post about it?

    Reply
    • Jessie
      August 21, 2017 at 8:39 pm (3 months ago)

      THe graph was made by a fan, I haven’t used it, I made mine as the pattern is written.

      Reply
  25. Debbie
    November 1, 2017 at 3:15 pm (3 weeks ago)

    Gauge is fine but it is way too short so I’m just going to keep adding rows following the increase pattern until it’s the length I want (hopefully it won’t be too wide by the end). Fingers crossed I don’t run out of the fabulous yarn I’m using (Stylecraft Cabaret – Storm).
    I’ll post a picture when it’s done…

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 1, 2017 at 4:02 pm (3 weeks ago)

      It is a cowl, so it’s rather short.

      Reply
  26. Lenora
    November 8, 2017 at 11:58 am (2 weeks ago)

    I’m probably really over thinking this but, where do I drop stitches? I made it to row 125 before this question popped up….

    Reply
    • Jessie
      November 8, 2017 at 12:58 pm (2 weeks ago)

      at the end

      Reply
      • Rob
        November 15, 2017 at 10:24 am (4 days ago)

        How many stitches do you need to knit before you drop the first three and how many stitches need to be knit between the drops?

        Reply
        • Jessie
          November 15, 2017 at 11:41 am (4 days ago)

          It’s all in the pattern, the drops are in the finishing section.

          Reply
          • Rob
            November 15, 2017 at 12:36 pm (4 days ago)

            Thanks, I got to the video after the optional short rows and thought that was the end. I just need to learn to read the full page. Thanks again

  27. Isobel
    September 21, 2017 at 12:29 pm (2 months ago)

    Hi Jesse, love the pattern and was successful in following it. I would like to try to do the ribs in an contrasting colour. I haven’t been able to determine which stitches I would do the contrasting colour in at the beginning. Is it possible for you to tell me how to cast on the stitches with the contrasting stitches in the correct place? Thanks for your help in this.

    Reply
  28. Jessie
    September 21, 2017 at 3:40 pm (2 months ago)

    If you look at the chart that was made by another reader, you should be able to determine which stitches should be in a contrasting color.

    Reply

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